Vinschgerl meets Hildegard von Bingen

7. September 2021

Vinschgerl made with 20% spelt and 80% rye baked with the help of my rye sourdough starter and a whole spelt biga. 

Vinschgauer, Vinschgerl… what are we talking about?

Vinschgerl, Vinschgauer… are flat buns made of ry and wheat, which are baked with yeast and sourdough. These are original from the Vinschgau region in the south of Tirol. For my own variant of the recipe I used spelt instead of wheat.

Schabzigerklee vs. bread spices from Hildegard von Bingen

Why do you use bread spices from Hildegard von Bingen in your Vinschgerl if the typical spice is Schabzigerklee? Unfortunately, I do not like Schabzigerklee because I find it too bitter. However I search for the perfect change. The bread spices from Hildegard von Bingen are strong enough, to taste them in the bread, without being too overwhealming. For me they fit Vinschgerl perfect!

Bread spices from Hildegard von Bingen

You can use this spice mix also form salads, fresh cheese or veggies.

1 tsp wild thyme – ground
1 tsp galgangal – ground
1 tsp anacyclus – ground
1 tsp fennel – ground
1 tsp salvia – dried and ground
1/2 – 1 tsp nutmeg – rubbed

My tips to bake them

If you pay attention to these 3 things, your Vinschgerl will be perfect:

1) the dough should not be too dry and have the consistency of cement

2) use a lot of flour when shaping! When working with rye breads I prefer to use too much rather than too less flour, or else the dough likes to glue on the working surface and you might not enjoy that. It is best if you use white rye flour.

3) pay attention during the final fermentation, that you see enough cracks on the surface. Have a look at the documentation at the recipe.

Have fun!

 Time schedule

 1. Day

20:00 Uhr Prepare sourdough starter & biga

21-22:00 Uhr Place biga in the fridge

 Baking day

08:00 Uhr Prepare main dough

09:30 Uhr Prepare buns & let proof

10:30 Uhr Bake buns

Vinschgerl meets Hildegard von Bingen

Vinschgerl made with 20% spelt and 80% rye baked with the help of my rye sourdough starter and a whole spelt biga. As spices I love to use my self made spice mix from Hildegard von Bingen, which fits perfectly!
Working time15 hrs
Waiting time1 hr
Total time16 hrs
Ergibt: 20 Vinschgerl à 80g

Ingredients

Rye sourdough

  • 170 g whole rye flour
  • 170 g water
  • 17 g rye sourdough starter @ 100% hydration

Biga

  • 170 g whole spelt flour
  • 102 g water
  • 1,2 g fresh yeast

Main dough

  • Rye sourdough
  • Biga
  • 510 g white rye flour
  • 408 g water 30°C
  • 19 g salt
  • 25 g molasses
  • 4 g bread spices I used my own from Hildegard von Bingen

Instructions

Rye sourdough

  • Mix sourdough starter in water and add flour. Mix well until you can see no clumps.
  • Let proof at 23°C during 12 hours. The sourdough starter should be active and have doubled in size.

Biga

  • Knead all ingredients into a ball and place in a glas.
  • Let start fermenting 1-2 hours at room temperature and place over night in the fridge.

Main dough

  • For the main dough, remember to take the biga about 1 hour before starting out of the fridge so that it comes to room temperature.
  • Knead all ingredients 3 minutes or until everything is well mixed.

Bulk fermentation

  • The bulk fermentation (when baking rye breads I let them in the bowl and cover the dough so it does not dry) takes 1,5 hours at 23°C.

Final fermentation

  • Weigh dough pieces of 80g and shape to round balls with the help of white rye flour.
  • Place on a baking paper and let proof at room temperature without covering them until you see the typical cracks on the surface. The final fermentation took in my case 1 hour.

Bake

  • Bake at 230°C 30-35 minutes or until you like their color.

Further recipes

Knowledge area

FAQ

Frequently asked questions regarding bread baking, baking with ancient grains and without eggs.

Sourdough: creation & feed procedure

Information regarding the creation and feeding procedure of 3 different sourdoughs.

Sourdough calculator

Calculate fast and easy what you need to mix, to reach the required amount of sourdough in a recipe.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.